Reflection on L

LEDITOR’S NOTE: Welcome to the A to Z Challenge, an exercise in self-flagellation we bloggers inflict upon ourselves to teach us discipline as writers and to build audience. During the month of April, I’ll be posting 26 times, once for every letter in the alphabet. Looking on the bright side, we can each be thankful this is an English language exercise and not Khmer, the language of Cambodia, which sets the world record with a 74-character alphabet! After some misgivings, I’ve decided to proceed with my initial idea of blogging about the special people in my life whose names begin with the appropriate letter. There will be difficulties, like having more than one special person whose names begin with the same letter, forcing me to choose. And then there are those letters — O, Q and X among them — where no name springs readily to mind. What will I do then? We’ll have to wait and see!

Leah with her Daddy.
Leah, at home with her Daddy.

L is for Leah

There’s nothing like the arrival of a first child to make you realize just how much you don’t know. Fortunately for Leah, our fumbling first attempts at parenthood probably helped her grow into the resilient woman she is today.

I remember her birth well enough, but what came immediately after was a daze, until it was finally time to take our baby home. I remember putting Leah into the new car seat that was strapped into our silver Volkswagen Rabbit. Once behind the wheel, I probably never again drove so carefully.

Leah somehow survived our early parenting attempts.
Leah somehow survived our early parenting attempts.

The first problem became apparent during the initial diaper change. The hospital had failed to remove Leah’s umbilical clamp, and it freaked us out. We probably should have just waited until her first pediatric checkup in a couple of days, but back then, we felt we had to drive back to the hospital immediately, even though it was freezing cold in Santa Fe, N.M. that April evening.

By the time we got back home, Leah was screaming, her mother was crying, and I was thinking that joining the French Foreign Legion seemed like a great idea. Fortunately for us, a couple of salty veterans — my parents — were on the scene after driving to New Mexico from Central Texas. My mother took her new granddaughter in her arms, and the crying stopped almost immediately, Leah perhaps sensing that she was finally in competent hands.

Now with three kids of her own, Leah knows the ins and outs of a laundry basket.
Now with three kids of her own, Leah knows the ins and outs of a laundry basket.

Growing up, my oldest daughter only disappointed me once, and that was when she couldn’t spell “biscuit” during a sixth-grade spelling bee. Everything else was smooth sailing, and it’s impossible to convey what a great feeling it is to think back and realize that “hey, that kid didn’t give me any problems!”

Under the tutelage of her own parents, Leah has now mastered the rearview mirror glare.
Under the tutelage of her own parents, Leah has now mastered the rearview mirror glare.
Leah, center, with co-workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
Leah, center, with fun-loving co-workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
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Leah has her nurse stethoscope!

Now the mother of three rambunctious boys, Leah balances her busy home life with her career as an RN at Johns Hopkins Hospital, one of the finest hospitals in the United States.

When I was still working, I knew I wasn’t doing my best unless I was also having fun, and it pleases me to see my daughter bringing the same trait to her own workplace. Though her job as a neurology nurse is difficult and sometimes risky, Leah clearly enjoys her work and loves her co-workers.

I couldn’t ask for a better daughter, and I’m pretty sure if there’s ever a biscuit on her patient’s tray, Leah could not only spell it correctly now, she might even help him butter it, too.

My oldest daughter has an infectious personality.
My oldest daughter has an infectious personality.
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20 Comments

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  1. What a great post! You must be so proud of your beautiful and intelligent daughter. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Such a relief when we realise that our children have grown up to be wonderful people, despite all our efforts! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Yay, Leah. i did not know she was born in Santa Fe. Love that town. A Superwoman in all facets.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Leah looks like a real fun person – jealous of that perfect rear view mirror glare 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. She seems like she would be a lot of fun as a co-worker! The jobs I loved the most were the ones where I could have a good laugh with my colleagues.

    Cheers – Ellen | http://thecynicalsailor.blogspot.com/2016/04/l-is-for-lazy-jacks-nancy-drew.html

    Liked by 2 people

  6. She looks like she’s having the time of her life at work! I wish I could find a job that I enjoyed so much. Also, my sister’s name is Leah!!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Leah is lovely! A nurse and a mother of three; a super woman! The newborn photo is so precious!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. After seeing that third photo, we should all be relieved to know that Leah didn’t grow up to be a basket case.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Leah’s excellent rearview mirror glare is enviable. She learnt from the best, I’m certain ;P

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Awww such a sweet post and congratulations to you! You were obviously doing something right! I hope someday down the road I will be able to say the same about mine – but I’m not so convinced. Your posts are always fun to read!

    Liked by 1 person

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