Privileged crybabies care more about ‘the Burn’ than ‘the Bern’

Loud-mouthed morons inside the Democratic National Convention.
Loud-mouthed morons inside the Democratic National Convention.

As an American, I’m no stranger to protest. Without lawful protest, we never would have passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin.

But I want to say that what took place last night inside the Democratic National Convention had nothing to do with a meaningful protest, and everything to do with a bunch of candy-ass babies throwing a tantrum when they didn’t get their way.

Although I support Hillary Clinton for president of the United States, I’ve got a lot of respect for Sen. Bernie Sanders. He brought a lot of energy and ideas to the campaign, and if he’d won the nomination, I’d have had no problem supporting him for president.

Yes, there is some ugliness involving the Democratic National Committee and leaked e-mails that show party officials favored Clinton over Sanders, but as Sanders’ own campaign officials have rightly pointed out, seven party officials favoring Clinton isn’t what lost the nomination for Sanders. Mrs. Clinton won the nomination, period.

There’s a time for protest, and a time to shut the hell up, take up our common yoke and pull together, and that’s a lesson that seems lost on Sanders’ Simpletons. Some are threatening to stay away from the polls, vote for the Green Party candidate, or even go over to the Dark Side and vote for the Cheeto Mussolini, Donald J. Trump.

bern

You know, there are Tibetan monks who, from time to time, will self-immolate as a sign of silent protest over Chinese occupation of their country. It’s been going on a long time, and although I’m horrified by their actions, I still kinda respect them. But the sad fact is, I can’t remember the name of a single immolated monk, and the Chinese are still in Tibet.

Here’s the thing about the monks though: Ineffectual though their protest may be, at least they’re not hurting anybody other than themselves. In fact, you might say they really know what it means to “Feel the Bern.”

Nuclear-Explosion-001But you Berniebots, I have no respect for you, because it’s not just yourselves that you’re willing to immolate, it’s the whole damned world that you’re threatening to torch! You didn’t get your way, so you want to burn it ALL down! Even your own Messiah has told you to lay off, but are you listening? Hell no!

My contempt for you knows no bounds, but I think Gunnery Sgt. Hartman said it best in his epic rant from “Full Metal Jacket.” It perfectly describes what you privileged, driveling morons are all about:

 

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16 Comments

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  1. Dad, I agree in some ways but not others. Sen. Sanders did not get the nomination, but that does mean that Clinton is entitled to my vote. Deciding to cast my vote for someone who more closely represents me, Jill Stein, isn’t throwing a tantrum. What it is, is being an educated, principled who won’t betray their values or be forced to pick the lesser of two evils. I for one, don’t appreciate the guilt trip people are trying to force on individuals who want to vote with their conscience, that is the true tantrum.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I contend that since a vote for Jill Stein stands ZERO chance of success, your vote is wasted, and gives the Forces of Evil the opportunity they need. If you would like a third party, then as my previous reblog of someone else’s post points out, it must be built from the grassroots, not once every 8 years when someone decides they’d like the most important elected office in the world.

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      • To paraphrase Orwell, obstructionism doesn’t constitute support of the alternative. When he wrote this about Nazis, “We are told that it is only people’s objective actions that matter, and their subjective feelings are of no importance. Thus, pacifists, by obstructing the war effort, are ‘objectively’ aiding Nazis; and therefore the fact that they may be personally hostile to Fascism is irrelevant.” I have been guilty of saying this myself more than once. This is not only dishonest; it also carries a severe penalty with it. If you disregard people’s motives, it becomes much harder to foresee their actions.

        Basically, not aiding Hillary to get elected (by not voting for her) does not mean that I’m for Trump or the “forces of evil.” Just that I stand by my convictions.

        Besides, Gary Johnson is taking as much if not more votes from Trump, as Jill Stein is from Hillary. It shouldn’t really effect the outcome so much as make a statement.

        Liked by 1 person

        • I think “standing by your convictions” sounds good, and on the surface, it’s very hard to argue against it. However, there’s the recent case involving Ralph Nader. When enough people think convictions first and reality second, a lot of bad shit can happen.

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    • For years I was a registered Democrat, but I have fallen away from the party with all the us versus them rhetoric. I have not morphed into a Republican, but I grew weary of some Democratic friends on Facebook that would bash people who were conservatives, or those who just did not agree with certain Democratic stances. I am definitely socially liberal, but over time I have started to become a bit more Libertarian in my view points. I liked what Bernie Sander stood for on many issues, but I was feeling I was leaning more towards the Libertarian party for a few years. I actually like Gary Johnson, and I am voting for him. I am a registered Democrat, but grew weary of the divisive nature of politics in this country. I did not feel Hillary should have ran, and there were several Democrats that were viable candidates. This election has been on of the most contentious, and has made me want to step away from politics with all the bickering fellow Americans get into. What ever happened to United We Stand. I want to be an American and find common ground with other Americans, even though personally I may not agree with everyone. I feel voting for Gary Johnson is really the only way I can do this.

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  2. Aaron I hate to tell you, but you are wrong, wrong, wrong. One day in ancient times I took your line of reasoning and voted for Ralph Nader, and as a result, some horrible person beat out the person I should have voted for. I can’t remember names, but I do know that I still regret it many, many, many years later. Sometimes you have to go with the better person in order to beat an evil, horrible, terrible, ignorant weirdo like Donald Trump. I have 81 years of experience, so I think you should take what I say to heart and follow your Dad and vote for Hillary, or something terrible might happen to our country that you will regret.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Aaron, “standing by your convictions” is a cop out. What it really means is “I’m too much of a petulant baby to do what really needs to be done.”.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jennifer in Texas July 26, 2016 — 11:32 pm

    The image of the monk on fire was from Vietnam. Here’s a link about it, although it is just Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Th%C3%ADch_Qu%E1%BA%A3ng_%C4%90%E1%BB%A9c. I just remember growing up with that image.

    About 3rd party voting – to me it’s an ethical issue you have to ask yourself. Take your vote seriously, especially if you live in a state that is strongly Democratic. A 3rd party candidate is not going to win at the national level, so what is the point of your vote? To protest? What is at stake? I think there is A LOT at stake this election. If I lived in a swing state or Democratic state, I would NOT vote for a 3rd party candidate to make a statement, because Trump is too big of a threat compared to Clinton (and her corporate leanings). He’s got no experience working with/for the public/regular people – he is careless with words and will horribly tear things apart. He’s divisive, full of hate. He’s HORRIBLE!

    I was involved with the Green Party for about 3 years once upon a time. We tried to get something called instant recall voting passed in Austin, as well as political spending limits. The spending expenditures cap passed, but not the IRV. But it was very difficult to get people elected (never did, actually), and to get the party on the statewide ballot. Before that I volunteered a lot for the Democratic Party. So, I’m more than just a come-around-4-year voter. In my opinion, we need to get the Democrats back in control to stave off more erosion of voting rights, the increase in corporate influence in our politics, etc. Please vote for Clinton. You don’t have to tell your friends! Ha!

    Liked by 1 person

    • My mistake about the Tibet vs. Vietnam. I had Googled Tibetan monks and it came up, but I didn’t check the source.

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    • Jennifer in Texas July 27, 2016 — 5:21 am

      It was instant runoff voting!!! Not recall. It was so long ago…but it is used in the elections for the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. And maybe in Australia? It saves money in preventing runoff elections and also gives a better reflection of voters’ true opinions, without a minority having too much influence.

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  5. Jennifer in Texas July 26, 2016 — 11:46 pm

    One more thing: I voted for Nader in 2000, to make a statement to the Democratic Party about the issues he was bringing up (and which are similar to Sanders). But! I only did it because my state, Texas, was guaranteed to go Republican (since their candidate was Texan). I know how the electoral system works, so I know the president is not elected by a popular vote across the states. And, Bush wasn’t that horrible as governor (he was president, yet!). So I still feel comfortable that what I did was OK. Voters in Florida, though, well, they should have thought it through, being a swing state. But then, there was also the weird ballot counting, and the Supreme Court deciding the election, so it wasn’t all Nader’s fault. I’m sure others disagree. But here we are in 2016, with many of the same concerns, and things worse because of Citizens United and the PATRIOT act, for example. But I do not beat ourselves up. I really think 9/11 threw our domestic politics for a loop, and kept us from moving forward on challenging corporate consolidation of power (remember the Battle in Seattle during a WTO meeting there, pre 9/11). So, that moved our country away from talking about these issues, and into fighting wars. But we are coming back to it all now. We need a Democrat in the White House to help, really. It trickles down, in who leads the agencies of the executive branch. And in who gets nominated to the USSC. Really – it matters.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jennifer in Texas July 26, 2016 — 11:52 pm

      I mean – he wasn’t president!!!

      And, also, instead of USSC, I should have put SCOTUS. I mean the Supreme Court.

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  6. I see all points but the real issue for me is that whatever has to be done to keep Trump out must be primary. He is a dangerous, frightening beast. Talk about loose cannon! Did no one read The Stand by Stephen King?. Donald Randall Trump Flag is a very dangerous alternative for our country. I am old enough to remember when his comments would have gotten him booted before the real election process got underway. So much anger, agression and complacency in our country now. It sickens and saddens me.

    Liked by 1 person

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